1934 $5 Bill Value (Rare Errors, “A”, “B”, “C” and “D” Series)

1934 $5 Bill Value Guides (Rare Errors, "A", "B", "C" and "D" Series)

The Bureau of engraving and printing printed 13 five-dollar bill series in 1934. You can recognize five $5 bill Silver Certificates with the blue seal and one brown-sealed North Africa note.

Later, five Federal Reserve notes with the green seal and two series from Hawaii with the brown seal came. As you can guess, the 1934 $5 bill value depends on the particular series, condition, and star existence in the serial number.

1934 $5 bill value Chart

Series Bills in uncirculated condition Bills in circulated condition Bills with a star ()
*by Silver Recyclers
1934 (blue seal) $45 $5 to $15 $85 to $425
1934 A, C, and D (blue seal) $45 $5 to $15 $50 to $250
1934 B (blue seal) $45 $5 to $15 $175 to $575
1934 North Africa A (yellow seal) $300 $85 $400 to $1,850
*by Old money prices
1934 A (blue seal) $25 to $35 $8 to $12 $200 to $350+
1934 A North Africa (yellow seal) $250+ $10 to $25 $500
1934 B and C (blue seal) $40 to $50 $10 to $12 $150 to $250
1934 D (blue seal) $25 $8 to $10 $75
1934 A to D (green seal) $30 to $50 $5 to $12 $125 to $225
1934 A Hawaii (brown seal) $250+ $30 to $50 $2,000 to $6,000

1934 $5 Bill Value Guides

Since you can recognize a few 1934 $5 bill types, you can expect them to come at different prices. Those with a star and ultimate condition are always the most expensive, while most worn-out pieces are worth their face value.

1934 and 1934 A to D $5 Silver Certificate

1934 and 1934 A to D $5 Silver Certificate

You can recognize five Silver Certificate $5 notes, and their value and collectability depend on their condition and particular series. All of them feature a blue seal right of Abraham Lincoln’s portrait.

Since these banknotes are not particularly rare, most in average condition are worth their face value. On the other hand, you can get $8 to $12 for those in top-notch condition, while the best specimens sometimes reach $45 at auctions.

Besides regular notes, you can find rare and pricey pieces with a star. Their price depends on the series, but they typically cost $75 to $350. Only rare banknotes in an MS 63 grade are worth about $575.

1934 A $5 North Africa Silver Certificate

1934 A $5 North Africa Silver Certificate

These particular banknotes were printed for the US army stationed in North Africa during WWII. Soldiers were paid with these bills to prevent the Germans from potentially taking over regular money.

Since they are relatively rare but highly used, you can expect to set aside $10 to $25 for those that spent time in circulation.

The thing is entirely different with uncirculated banknotes that are worth at least $250. The most expensive are pieces with a star, and their value is over $500. The price can go up to $1,850 for well-preserved ones.

1934 and 1934 A to D Federal Reserve note

1934 and 1934 A to D Federal Reserve note

The $5 Federal Reserve notes with a green seal came in five different series in 1934, and all are abundant on the market. Despite slight differences, almost all these banknotes are worth their face value. Only beautiful better-preserved pieces can be worth up to $12.

Rare bills in perfect condition cost $30 to $50, while those with the star can be costly, depending on the condition. The worst specimens are worth about $20, but you should set aside approximately $125 to $225 for those in high grades.

1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve note

1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve note

The 1934 A Hawaii banknotes differentiate from other $5 bills by the brown seal positioned on the right. These banknotes were printed during the war to prevent the enemy from getting hold of American money.

They are relatively rare nowadays, particularly those in top-notch condition. Ordinary pieces can reach the price of $30 to $50, while excellently preserved bills typically cost $250+.

Interestingly, notes with a star are highly rare and valuable. If you are lucky to have such a piece, you can count on getting about $2,000 to $6,000 for it.

1934 $5 Bill Errors

The 1934 $5 bills were printed in relatively large amounts, and you can expect to see some misprints, making these pieces highly collectible and valuable. Most errors enhance bills’ price, so you should check them for imperfections like:

  • Inverted serial numbers
  • The wrong digit in the serial number
  • Overprints
  • Double or misplaced seals
  • Gutter folds
  • Mis-cut bills
  • Off-center

History of the 1934 $5 Bill

The first $5 Silver Certificate bills were printed in 1886, while the last appeared in 1953. Those issued in 1934 came in five series and two types, regular ones and pieces specially produced during the war.

While the regular five series have a recognizable blue seal, the 1934 North Africa A came with a yellow seal. The idea was to prevent the Germans from misusing them in case of stealing large quantities.

1934 small size $5 bill series

Note type First delivery date Last delivery date
1934 Silver Certificate 20th July 1934 /
1934 Federal Reserve note 2nd November 1934 /
1934 A Silver Certificate 27th January 1938 /
1934 A Federal Reserve note Probably 1938 /
1934 B Federal Reserve note 19th November 1945 /
1934 B Silver Certificate 6th February 1946 /
1934 C Federal Reserve note 30th September 1946 /
1934 C Silver Certificate 19th December 1946 /
1934 D Silver Certificate 25th October 1949 1st October 1953
1934 D Federal Reserve note 3rd January 1950 31st January 1951

Besides these early banknotes, The US BEP also produced Federal Reserve notes with a green seal this year.

To make things even more complicated, there are the 1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve notes with a brown seal printed for a particular use during WWII. The specific appearance of these banknotes ensured their distinction from regular ones and prevented possible fraud in case the Germans stole them.

how to identify 1934 $5 Bill?

The front page of the 1934 $5 bill

Front Page of the 1934 $5 Bill

Series of 1934 $5 bills have Abraham Lincoln’s portrait on the front page with different seals on the right. These bills are still without the motto IN GOD WE TRUST.

They have two serial numbers, including one above the seal on the right. The other is below the black seal or the denomination on the left, depending on the banknote type. These numbers are always the same, and any deviation implies the existence of an error.

  • 1934 $5 bill Silver Certificate – These banknotes come with a blue seal on the right and a blue number FIVE on the left, representing the denomination.
  • 1934 A North Africa Silver Certificate – Besides the blue number FIVE on the left, you can recognize the yellow seal on the right bill side.
  • 1934 $5 bill Federal Reserve note – Besides the green treasury seal with a toothed trim on the right, you can notice a black seal representing the Federal Reserve System on the left.
  • 1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve note – This bill type has the black seal on the left and an atypical brown seal on the right front page half.

The back page of the 1934 $5 bill

Back Page of the 1934 $5 Bill

All 1934 $5 bills feature the Lincoln Memorial on the back page regardless of the seal stamped on the front page. The denomination FIVE DOLLARS is below the building, while the name UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is along the upper edge. Only bills with a brown seal have overprinted HAWAII across the entire page.

1934 $5 bill

Face value $5
Shape Rectangular
Material 75% cotton and 25% linen
Type 1934, 1934 A, 1934 B, 1934 C, 1934 D Silver Certificate
1934 A North Africa Silver Certificate
1934, 1934 A, 1934 B, 1934 C, 1934 D Federal Reserve notes
1934, 1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve notes
Producer The BEP
Printing place Washington DC
The front page The 16th American President, Abraham Lincoln
The back page The Lincoln Memorial
Series Five with a blue seal, one with a yellow seal, five with a green seal, and two with the brown seal
Bill weight 0.03529 ounces (1 g)
Bill height 2.60938 inches (66.28 mm)
Bill width 6.14061 inches (156 mm)
Seal variety Blue, yellow, green, brown
Security features Raised texture and security fibers

Other features of the 1934 $5 bill

Signature

1934 with a blue seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 A with a blue seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 B with a blue seal

  • Frederick Moore Vinson (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 C with a blue seal

  • John W. Snyder (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 D with a blue seal

  • John W. Snyder (Treasury Secretary)
  • Georgia Neese Clark Gray (Treasurer)

1934 A North Africa with a yellow seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 with a green seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 Hawaii with a brown seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 A with a green seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 A Hawaii with a brown seal

  • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 B with a green seal

  • Frederick Moore Vinson (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 C with a green seal

  • John W. Snyder (Treasury Secretary)
  • William Alexander Julian (Treasurer)

1934 D with a green seal

  • John W. Snyder (Treasury Secretary)
  • Georgia Neese Clark Gray (Treasurer)

1934 $5 bill types

$5 bill Type Seal color
1934 Silver Certificate blue
1934 A Silver Certificate blue
1934 B Silver Certificate blue
1934 C Silver Certificate blue
1934 D Silver Certificate blue
1934 A North Africa Silver Certificate yellow
1934 Federal Reserve note green
1934 A Federal Reserve note green
1934 B Federal Reserve note green
1934 C Federal Reserve note green
1934 D Federal Reserve note green
1934 Hawaii Federal Reserve notes brown
1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve notes brown

Printing

Like other US currencies, 1934 $5 bills included raised printing as one of the security features. You can be sure that your banknote is not fake only if you feel that specific texture under your fingers.

Paper

People often consider banknotes as paper money. However, all American notes, including five-dollar bills printed in 1934, are made of cotton and linen.

FAQ about the 1934 $5 Bill

What makes a 1934 $5 bill rare?

Most 1934 $5 bills are common and inexpensive, but the real gems are the 1934 A Hawaii Federal Reserve notes with a star in excellent condition.

These rare banknotes are typically worth $2,000 to $6,000. The 1934 North Africa A Silver Certificate with a star is also scarce, and the best-preserved pieces can cost up to $1,850.

Which 1934 $5 bill is pricey?

  • 1934 $5 bill Silver Certificate with a blue seal and solid serial number sold for $15,600 (choice uncirculated condition)
  • The 1934 C $5 bill Silver Certificate star note with a blue seal sold for $11,750 (choice uncirculated condition)
  • 1934 C $5 bill Silver Certificate with a blue seal and a solid serial number 99999999 sold for $11,162 (gem uncirculated condition)
  • 1934 A $5 bill Silver Certificate with a blue seal sold for $8,400 (an original pack of 100 pieces in a choice uncirculated condition)
  • 1934 D $5 bill Silver Certificate with a blue seal sold for $8,100 (an uncut sheet of 12 pieces in a gem uncirculated condition)
  • 1934 B $5 bill mule Silver Certificate star note with a blue seal sold for $7,800 (circulated condition)

How much is the 1934 $5 bill worth?

Most 1934 $5 bill notes cost their face value, and only well-preserved ones can reach $8 to $12. The most pricey are banknotes with the star, typically worth a few hundred dollars.

What is the first printed $5 bill?

The first $5 bill was printed in 1861 as a Demand Note. It had an Alexander Hamilton portrait on the right front page and a statue symbolizing freedom on the left.

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