1943 Mercury Dime Coin Value (Rare Errors, “D”, “S” & No Mint Marks)

1943 Mercury Dime Value

When Adolph Weinman designed the Winged Liberty Head dime in 1916, he could not guess that his coin would be remembered in history by the name of a Roman god of commerce, Mercury. The US Mint struck pieces with this pleasing design for 29 years, from 1916 to 1945.

Thanks to their availability on the market, most of these coins are affordable, particularly modern pieces. Therefore, you can expect the 1943 Mercury dime value to be relatively low except for rare, well-preserved specimens. For instance, the most expensive dime on the market costs almost $20,000.

1943 dime value Chart

Condition 1943 No Mint mark dime 1943 D dime 1943 S dime
Good $2.21 $2.21 $2.21
Very good $2.78 $2.78 $2.78
Fine $3.32 $3.32 $3.32
Very fine $3.43 $3.43 $3.43
Extra fine $3.58 $3.58 $3.58
AU $4.69 $5 $4.75
MS 60 $6.37 $6.37 $7.32
MS 63 $28 $35 $35

1943 Mercury Dime Value Guides

The mintage of 324,059,000 Mercury dimes struck in three mints was pretty high. Unfortunately, most circulated for a long time, and their value is affordable, despite age. These coins are still among the most collectible American coinage, thanks to their impeccable beauty and elegance.

1943 No Mint mark dime Value

1943 No Mint mark Mercury

The Philadelphia mint had a far highest mintage in 1943 with 191,710,000 struck dimes. Since these war coins spent years in circulation, you shouldn’t expect to earn much money when selling your specimen.

Most low-grade coins cost $2 to $6.5, and even those in the mint state typically cost $7 to $35. Only beautiful pieces with the highest rating can reach $60. However, the situation is a bit different with Full Bands dimes.

1943 Mercury dime value

Condition 1943 dime 1943 D dime 1943 S dime
Good $2 $2 $2
Very good $2 $2 $2
Fine $2.15 $2.15 $2.15
Very fine $2.65 to $2.75 $2.65 to $2.75 $2.65 to $2.75
Extra fine $3.25 $3.25 $3.25
AU $3.35 to $6.50 $3.35 to $6.50 $3.35 to $6.50
MS 60 $7 to $9 $7 to $9 $7 to $9
MS 61 $7 to $9 $7 to $9 $7 to $9
MS 62 $7 to $9 $7 to $9 $7 to $9
MS 63 $9 to $11 $10 to $13 $10 to $13
MS 64 $14 to $19 $14 to $19 $14 to $19
MS 65 $18 to $26 $18 to $26 $18 to $26
MS 66 $26 to $36 $26 to $36 $26 to $36
MS 67 $48 to $60 $48 to $60 $50 to $60
MS 68 / / $500 to $600

The Mercury dimes Full Bands are typically worth $10 to $250, but the best-ranking specimens often reach $6,000 to $7,500 at auctions. Still, one extraordinary 1943 MS 68 FB Mercury dime won the auction record of $19,550 in 2010.

1943 D dime Value

1943 D Mercury dime

Depending on their quality and preservation levels, you can buy most 1943 Mercury dimes produced in Denver for $2 to $60. Even though the mintage of 71,949,000 pieces was high, most coins are worn out after long-circulating.

Those with Full Bands are typically the most pricey, and you can count on $10 to $145 per piece in the mint state. Experts estimate those in an MS 68 grade to cost about $1,100 to $1,300, but one collector paid $14,688 for the rare 1943 D MS 68+ FB Mercury dime in 2019.

1943 S dime Value

1943 S Mercury dime

The San Francisco mint produced 60,400,000 Mercury dimes in 1943, achieving the lowest circulation in this war year. Their value is similar to coins minted in the other two mints and is typical $2 to $60. However, you can find beautiful specimens with an MS 68 rating that can be worth $500 to $600.

Dimes with Full Bands cost $15 to $320 on average, but the highest-graded specimens are estimated to be worth $2,600 to $3,000. The most precious is the one in an MS 68 grade sold at an auction in 2022 for $16,800.

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1943 Mercury Dime Errors and Variations

Mercury dimes minted in 1943 come with only a few rare and insignificant errors, but they are famous for the Full Bands variation. Collectors look for these pieces because they show the reverse design as it should have been if there were no restrictions on mintage.

Variations

Collectors particularly appreciate Mercury dimes with original mint luster and clearly visible, excellently struck Full Bands. They show complete horizontal lines wrapping a torch. These crossbands of the fasces are a part of the original design, but many dimes come with incomplete bands because of limitations in minting.

1943 FB Mercury dime value

Condition 1943 FB dime 1943 FB D dime 1943 FB S dime
MS 61 $12 to $18 $12 to $18 $16 to $22
MS 62 $14 to $20 $14 to $20 $18 to $24
MS 63 $16 to $22 $18 to $24 $20 to $26
MS 64 $20 to $26 $24 to $34 $24 to $30
MS 65 $28 to $36 $36 to $46 $66 to $79.20
MS 66 $52 to $64 $40 to $50 $88 to $105
MS 67 $195 to $234 $130 to $145 $265 to $318
MS 68 $6,000 to $7,500 $1,100 to $1,300 $2,600 to $3,000

*by Greysheet

Errors

The 1943 Mercury dimes rarely come with errors. Even though a few coins appeared with obverse lamination and doubled dates, they are unclassified. Most are inexpensive, except for one piece with a rare mint error. You can find this specimen in a VF 35 grade with lamination on eBay. It can be yours for $13,500.

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History of the 1943 Mercury Dime

The Winged Liberty Head dimes (Mercury dimes) are popular American ten-cent coins made of 90% silver. The US Mint produced these pieces from 1916 to 1945 before Roosevelt dimes replaced them in 1946.

The Treasury Department organized a design competition in 1916. The plan was to replace old Barber dimes existing since 1892.

The winner was Adolph A. Weinman, who wanted to depict a young Lady Liberty with a winged cap on her head. However, Americans found it similar to the Roman god Mercury, and it happened that the coin has stayed known in history as the Mercury dime.

The first pieces were released into circulation on 30th October 1916, after three mints from San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Denver struck them. Unfortunately, the beginning of minting was inglorious because these coins were incompatible with vending machines.

Therefore, the US Mint needed to modify the design and replace these coins as soon as possible. The result was a new dime with President Franklin Roosevelt on the obverse.

1943 Mercury dime

Location Year Minted
Philadelphia 1943 No Mint mark dime 191,710,000
Denver 1943 D dime 71,949,000
San Francisco 1943 S dime 60,400,000
Total / 324,059,000

Nowadays, Mercury dimes are highly collectible, and serious collectors prefer completing so-called Dansco sets. They include one example of every mint mark and minting year ever produced.

You can find two set types, depending on your budget. Some are affordable, while those with graded specimens, including precious key dates, cost thousands of dollars.

Only dimes minted in the Denver mint are in a group of highly valuable key dates. Sometimes, collectors pay specimens in the mint mark tens of thousands of dollars.

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How to identify the 1943 Mercury Dime?

The Winged Liberty Head (Mercury) dime is an attractive coin minted from 1916 to 1945. Collectors agree that Adolph Weinman did an excellent job with the new design, making these dimes one of the most beloved and collectible American coinage.

The obverse of the 1943 Mercury dime

The obverse of the 1943 Mercury dime

You can hear speculations that Elsie Stevens, wife of the prominent American poet, was a model for this coin. However, it is impossible to find official confirmation to prove that. Anyway, a central figure on the reverse represents a young Lady Liberty facing left.

Weinman wanted to depict liberty of thought, but the wings on her Phrygian cap became a reason for confusion. Most Americans found the image similar to the Roman god Mercury, leaving the nickname to stay forever.

The largely written word LIBERTY is along the periphery, while the DATE is struck on the right. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is cramped in the lower left corner in front of Liberty’s neck. Above are also the designer’s initials.

The reverse of the 1943 Mercury dime

The reverse of the 1943 Mercury dime

The reverse center is occupied by a torch and an axe, symbolizing war efforts and strength. Olive branches, representing an International symbol of peace, wrap them, making a balance.

The composition also comprises the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and ONE DIME inscriptions. Pieces minted in San Francisco and Denver have the mint mark placed left of the branch. Finally, the right half is reserved for the inevitable Latin saying.

1943 Mercury dime

Face value Ten cents ($0.10)
Shape Round
Compound Silver coin with 0.900 silver and 0.100 copper
Coin thickness 0.05315 inches (1.35 mm)
Coin diameter 0.70512 inches (17.91 mm)
Coin weight 0.08038 troy ounces (2.5 g)
Silver content 0.07234 troy ounces (2.25 g)
Edge Reeded with 118 reeds

Other features of the 1943 Mercury dime

The silver 1943 Mercury dime has a face value of ten cents and contains 0.900 silver and 0.100 copper. That means each piece weighing 0.08038 troy ounces (2.5 g) contains 0.07234 troy ounces (2.25 g) of pure silver.

This round coin with an edge containing 118 reeds is thick 0.05315 inches (1.35 mm). Its diameter is standard for this coinage and is equal to 0.70512 inches (17.91 mm).

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What makes a 1943 Mercury dime rare?

Most dimes minted this year are common coins, except for a few rare errors and beautiful pieces with Full Bands. Some are valuable and collectible, but experts never consider them particularly scarce.

Which 1943 Mercury dime is worth a lot of money?

  • The 1943 MS 68 Full Bands dime auction record from 2010 was $19,550 at Heritage Auctions
  • The 1943 S MS 68 Full Bands dime auction record from 2022 was $16,800 at Heritage Auctions
  • The 1943 D MS 68+ Full Bands dime auction record from 2019 was $14,688 at Legend RC Auctions
  • The 1943 S UNC Details dime auction record from 2021 was $2,950 on eBay
  • The 1943 S/S MS 67+ RPM Full Bands dime auction record from 2015 was $2,820 at Heritage Auctions
  • The 1943 S/S MS 67+ RPM dime auction record from 2015 was $1,645 at Stack’s Bowers
  • The 1943 D MS 68 dime auction record from 2022 was $925 on eBay
  • The 1943 S MS 65 Trumpet Tail MM FB dime auction record from 2019 was $475 on eBay
  • The 1943 MS 68 dime auction record from 2006 was $460 at Heritage Auctions
  • The 1943 S MS 66 Trumpet Tail MM dime auction record from 2018 was $375 on eBay

How much money you can get for the 1943 No Mint mark Mercury dime?

Most heavily circulated and worn-out dimes are worth $2 to $6.5, while those in the mint state cost $7 to $60. However, the situation is a bit different with Full Bands dimes.

These specimens are more expensive, with a price range of $10 to $250. Finally, you should set aside $6,000 to $7,500 for the highest-graded dimes.

What is the most pricey Mercury dimes?

While most Mercury dimes are affordable nowadays, a few top-notch specimens offered at auctions are expensive. Therefore, you shouldn’t be surprised by high auction records. Collectors paid unbelievable sums for such pieces, and the most costly were paid:

  • $364,250 for the 1938 S MS 68+ Full Bands dime in 2019
  • $270,250 for the 1931 S MS 67+ Full Bands dime in 2019
  • $207,000 for the 1916 D MS 67 dime in 2010
  • $156,000 for the 1919 D MS 66 Full Bands dime in 2019
  • $144,000 for the 1918 S MS 67 Full Bands dime in 2019
  • $120,000 for the 1942/1 MS 66 Full Bands dime in 2018
  • $105,750 for the 1923 S MS 66 Full Bands dime in 2018
  • $103,500 for the 1919 S MS 66 dime in 2006

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