1885 Silver Dollar Coin Value (Rare Errors, “O”, “S”, “CC” and No Mint Mark)

1885 Silver Dollar Value

All Morgan silver dollars produced from 1878 to 1904, particularly those minted in the 19th century, are highly collectible and desirable among collectors nowadays. The initial silver dollar mintage was never too high because of the limited silver amount in the US Mint’s reserves.

Finally, a silver shortage stopped production in 1904, and this lovely coin disappeared from use after one more attempt in 1921. Nowadays, the 1885 silver dollar value is high due to the limited number on the market.

1885 Morgan silver dollar value

Condition 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 1885 O

silver dollar

1885 S

silver dollar

1885 CC silver dollar
Good $26 $26 $26 $486
Very good $32 $33 $32 $512
Fine $38 $38 $38 $563
Very fine $44 $44 $44 $613
Extra fine $47 $47 $63 $656
AU $50 $50 $165 $667
Mint state 60 $59 $59 $852 $789
Mint state 65 $203 $203 $57,096 $1,231
Proof 63 $3,220 / / /

 

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Value Guides

Four mints struck 28,697,767 Morgan silver dollars in 1885. Rare highly-preserved coins are expensive and collectible nowadays, and only serious collectors can afford some scarce pieces.

1885 No Mint mark silver dollar Value

1885 No Mint Mark Morgan Silver Dollar

With 17,787,000 produced Morgan silver dollars, Philadelphia had the highest mintage in 1885. Despite that, even pieces in good condition are valuable, and you should set aside about $30 for one. Coins in the mint state have different prices depending on the preservation level.

For instance, you can find those in an MS 60 grade for approximately $50 to $60. On the other hand, those with an MS 68 rating are precious and can cost over $20,000. The auction record won a coin sold at Legend Rare Coin Auctions in 2015 for an incredible $39,950.

1885 Morgan silver dollar value

Condition 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 1885 O

silver dollar

1885 S

silver dollar

1885 CC silver dollar
MS 65 $180 to $220 $180 to $220 $1,600 to $1,700 $1,150 to $1,323
MS 66 $315 to $385 $315 to $385 $4,000 to $4,500 $2,000 to $2,200
MS 67 $1,200 to $1,550 $1,150 to $1,175 $45,000 to $54,000 $7,600 to $8,400
MS 68 $20,000 to $24,000 $21,000 to $26,000 / $45,000 to $60,000

 

1885 proof silver dollar Value

1885 proof Morgan silver dollar

Besides coins from the regular strike, the Philadelphia mint produced 930 Morgan silver dollar proofs in 1885. Their price goes from $1,000 to $15,000 on the coin market, but rare pieces in PR 67 grade with cameo contrast are worth up to $25,000.

The most expensive proof Morgan struck this year is the one in a PR 69 grade sold in 2011 at Goldberg Auctioneers for an unbelievable $92,000.

1885 proof Morgan silver dollar value

Condition 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 1885 No Mint mark CAM silver dollar 1885 No Mint mark DCAM silver dollar
PR 60 $2,290 to $2,760 $2,530 to $3,036 $3,000 to $3,600
PR 61 $2,400 to $2,880 $2,640 to $3,168 $ 3,250to $3,900
PR 62 $2,650 to $3,180 $2,915 to $3,498 $3,500 to $4,200
PR 63 $2,975 to $3,570 $3,273 to $3,927 $4,300 to $5,160
PR 64 $3,600 to $4,320 $3,960 to $4,900 $6,750 to $8,100
PR 65 $4,850 to $5,820 $5,335 to $6,800 $9,000 to $10,800
PR 66 $6,400 to $7,500 $7,040 to $9,300 $11,500 to $15,000
PR 67 $13,000 to $15,600 $17,500 to $25,000 /

 

1885 O silver dollar Value

1885 O Morgan silver dollar

The survived 1885 Morgan silver dollars of 9,185,000 produced in New Orleans typically cost $30 to $60, depending on the degree of wear. On the other hand, pieces in the mint state are expensive and cost $55 to $1,175, depending on the preservation level.

Only rare, highly graded pieces can reach $21,000 to $26,000. The most pricey is the one in an MS 68 grade sold at Heritage Auctions in 2015 for $37,600.

1885 PL Morgan silver dollar value

Condition 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 1885 O

silver dollar

1885 S

silver dollar

1885 CC silver dollar
MS 65 $255 to $303.60 $253 to $303.60 $8,200 to $9,840 $1,500 to $1,800
MS 66 $525 to $630 $900 to $1,100 $16,000 to $19,200 $3,000 to $3,600
MS 67 $4,100 to $6,000 / / $15,500 to $18,600

 

1885 S silver dollar Value

1885 S Morgan silver dollar

Since the San Francisco mint struck a modest 1,497,000 Morgan silver dollars in 1885, you can expect high prices, particularly for well-preserved coins. While those in circulated condition typically cost under $200, rare coins in the mint state always reach significant sums.

While pieces in an MS 67 grade minted in other mints cost several thousand dollars, the price of those with the S mint mark is estimated at $45,000 to $54,000. The most expensive is the one sold in 2012. One collector paid $48,875 for it at Heritage Auctions.

1885 DMPL Morgan silver dollar

Condition 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 1885 O

silver dollar

1885 S

silver dollar

1885 CC

silver dollar

MS 65 $950 to $1,140 $925 to $1,110 $32,500 to $39,000 $3,120 to $3,720
MS 66 $2,400 to $2,880 $2,350 to $2,820 / $8,200 to $9,500
MS 67 $18,000 to $21,600 $11,000 to $14,000 / $35,000 to $45,000
MS 68 / / / $75,000 to $90,000

 

1885 CC silver dollar Value

1885 CC Morgan silver dollar

228,000 Morgan silver dollars were minted in Carson City in 1885, making them valuable on the current coin market. Even those in circulated condition cost $450 to $660, while pieces in perfect condition often reach a price of $600 to $8,400.

The best-preserved specimens from a regular strike in an MS 68 grade are worth $45,000 to $60,000. Collectors are often prepared to set aside $75,000 to $90,000 for deep mirror proof-like pieces.

The most expensive Morgan minted this year also came from the Carson City mint. This coin in an MS 68+ grade was paid $135,125 at Legend Rare Coin Auctions in 2015.

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1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Errors

The US Mint destroyed all error coins before releasing them into circulation as pieces that couldn’t meet technical requirements. Even though some collectors report a few errors, like obverse struck through, off-center, and micro-O error, the fact is that Morgan silver dollars typically came without imperfections.

On the other hand, you can quickly run into a fake Morgan silver dollar at online auction sites. There are several ways to recognize counterfeited coins, including:

Minting year – The US Mint produced Morgans only during the period from 1878 to 1904 and later in 1921. You can be sure your coin is fake if you spot any other year on the obverse.

Mint marks – Only five mints produced these silver dollars over time, so that you can see only the O, S, D, or CC mint mark on the obverse. Pieces minted in Philadelphia came without the mint mark. Any other letter struck below the wreath signifies the coin is fake. Plus, some counterfeiters can add or remove the mint mark, so you should be careful.

Weight – Morgan silver dollars weigh precisely 0.85939 troy ounces (26.73 g). Most original coins weigh slightly less than expected because of wear, but this value is significantly lower in counterfeit pieces. Most fake coins come with a weight of 0.57871 to 0.70732 troy ounces (18 – 22 g).

Diameter and thickness – Fake Morgans are typically wider and thinner than authentic pieces.

Metal composition – You can hardly notice a difference in silver content with the naked eye. However, you can check your coin’s magnetic characteristics since silver is not a magnetic metal. Unfortunately, there is a catch! If the fake Morgan is made of aluminum, this test will fail.

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History of the 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar

Elegant, shiny, and heavy Morgan (Liberty Head) silver dollars are unique US coins minted from 1878 to 1904 and later in 1921. They are collectible, thanks to their age and uniqueness, plus they are an excellent investment because of their silver content and stable value.

1885 Morgan silver dollar

Location Year Minted
Philadelphia 1885 No Mint mark silver dollar 17,787,000
Philadelphia 1885 proof silver dollar 930
New Orleans 1885 O silver dollar 9,185,000
San Francisco 1885 S silver dollar 1,497,000
Carson City 1885 CC silver dollar 228,000
Total / 28,697,767

Morgans were the first dollars containing silver after the Bland-Allison Act from 1873 that allowed purchasing silver. Therefore, the US Mint could start minting new coins created by George T. Morgan’s design. Pieces struck in 1885 were in a group of early date series with a low mintage, making these beautiful pieces precious for collectors.

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How to Identify 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar?

Over a century old 1885 Morgan silver dollars are highly collectible and often pricey. Even those in the worst condition cost something, thanks to the silver content.

The obverse of the 1885 Morgan silver dollar

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Obverse

You can see Lady Liberty on the Morgan silver dollar obverse surrounded by the DATE and saying E PLURIBUS UNUM. Thirteen stars in between represent the first states.

The reverse of the 1885 Morgan silver dollar

1885 Morgan Silver Dollar Reverse

The inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and ONE DOLLAR struck along the rim surround a centrally positioned eagle with spread wings. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is above its head, while you can see a laurel wreath below its talons holding three arrows and an olive branch.

1885 Morgan silver dollar

Face value One dollar ($1)
Compound 90% silver with copper
Coin weight 0.85939 troy ounces (26.73 g)
Silver weight 0.77344 troy ounces (24.06 g)
Coin diameter 1.5 inches (38.1 mm)
Coin thickness 0.09449 inches (2.4 mm)
Shape Round
Edge Reeded

Other features of the 1885 Morgan silver dollar

The 1885 Morgan silver dollar contains 90% of this precious metal with added copper and weighs 0.85939 troy ounces (26.73 g). Since it has 0.77344 troy ounces (24.06 g) of silver, its minimum value depends on the price of silver, regardless of the condition.

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What makes an 1885 Morgan silver dollar rare?

Since the Carson City mint produced 228,000 Morgan silver dollars in 1885, surviving pieces in the mint state are rare. The most valuable are scarce deep mirror proof-like specimens worth an impressive $75,000 to $90,000.

Which 1885 Morgan silver dollar is worth a lot of money?

  • 1885 CC MS 68+ Morgan silver dollar sold in 2015 at Legend Rare Coin Auctions cost $135,125
  • 1885 PR 69 CAM Morgan silver dollar sold in 2012 at Heritage Auctions cost $100,625
  • 1885 PR 69 Morgan silver dollar sold in 2011 at Goldberg Auctioneers cost $92,000
  • 1885 CC MS 67 DMPL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2008 at Heritage Auctions cost $51,750
  • 1885 S MS 67 Morgan silver dollar sold in 2012 at Heritage Auctions cost $48,875
  • 1885 PR 68 DCAM Morgan silver dollar sold in 2017 at Heritage Auctions cost $44,650
  • 1885 No Mint mark MS 68+ Morgan silver dollar sold in 2015 at Legend Rare Coin Auctions cost $39,950
  • 1885 O MS 68 Morgan silver dollar sold in 2015 at Heritage Auctions cost $37,600
  • 1885 No Mint mark MS 67 DMPL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2020 at Stack’s Bowers cost $26,400
  • 1885 No Mint mark MS NGO PL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2007 at Stack’s Bowers cost $20,000
  • 1885 CC MS 67 PL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2022 at Heritage Auctions cost $15,600
  • 1885 S MS 65+ PL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2016 at Heritage Auctions cost $9,988
  • 1885 O MS 66 DMPL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2005 at Heritage Auctions cost $8,625
  • 1885 S MS 64 DMPL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2001 at Heritage Auctions cost $5,807
  • 1885 O MS 66 PL Morgan silver dollar sold in 2018 at Heritage Auctions cost $1,800

How much is the 1885 No Mint mark Morgan silver dollar worth?

The 1885 Morgan silver dollar is valuable in the low grades, considering it is an old coin. They typically cost $25 to $50, but top-notch pieces in the mint state can reach $200.

What is the most pricey Morgan silver dollar?

Many Morgan silver dollars in the mint state are precious, including nine paid over half a million dollars:

  • 1889 CC paid $881,250
  • 1886 O paid $780,000
  • 1884 S paid $750,000
  • 1893 S paid $735,000
  • 1896 S paid $720,000
  • 1892 S paid $630,000
  • 1901 paid $587,500
  • 1895 O paid $575,000
  • 1896 O paid $528,000

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